"dazzle gradually"

"Dazzle Gradually" 2017 poems, paintings, new art & photography--a diary, a discipline, a delight. Read over my shoulder as I post my unedited poetry ---you can see it in the raw or get my first book and see how the work evolves with new books rolling out next year.


Polly Alice

Saturday, September 18, 2010

Get along little doggie- a folk song

This is my alternate version of Streets of Laredo, the Cowboy's Lament.  Feel free to print, sing, or perform this version, but please remember to put my name on it--Thanks. 

One older form of this song is about a dying cowboy who wished he'd lived his life differently.  Most children's versions, however, contain the chorus by Woodie Guthrie 'get along little dogie.'  His version is about a cowboy taking the orphaned calfs on the trail to Wyoming. 
Maybe a song that makes you cry is a lost art in mainstream music, but in folk music I think this is still an honored quality. 

I don't believe children mind singing terribly sad songs either -- there's something in making your parents cry when they come to hear your school concert :) 

You'll have to read below to find out if this one is sad.  (The artwork is by one of my preschool art students from 2007).


As I was a walking one morning for pleasure
I spied a young cowboy a-walking along.
His dog were a with him an' the leash it were hanging.
And as they approached, he was singing this song.

[Chorus]
Hey, Hey!
Get along little doggie.
We've taken our turn; we're all on our own.
Hey, Hey!
Get along little doggie.
You know that it's time to get along home.

"Early each morning I take out the doggie:
he barks, he jumps, he wags his fair tail.
But then when I leave him to go on my journey,
he circles the yard and wears in the trail.

[Chorus]

As I was a walking one morning for pleasure,
I spied the young cowboy a-walking alone.
His eyes were a red, like he had been crying,
"My dog he did die, and now he is gone."

[Chorus]

Hey, Hey!
Get along little doggie.
We've taken our turn.  I'm all on my own.
Hey, Hey!
Get along little doggie.
I know it's your time to get along home.


"Let's take him together and lay the sod o'er him,
and then, I told him, we'll have a good cry.
You'll sit down beside me and tell your sad story,
of how that sweet pup so sadly did die."


[Chorus]


Hey, Hey!
Get along little doggie.
You've taken your turn. We're all on our own.
Hey, Hey!
Get along little doggie.
Now it's your time to get along home.

I spied the young cowboy early next morning.
He looked a sight sorrowful and he couldn't sing his song.
"Your dog, I told him, runs in a green valley,
so let's walk together even tho' he is gone."

[Chorus]

Hey, Hey!
Get along little doggie.
You've taken your turn. We're all on our own.
Hey, Hey!
Get along little doggie.
Now it's our time to get along home.

2 comments:

  1. This is great! Streets of Laredo has such a storied history and has been adapted by so many different artists -- I really think it's cool that you're continuing that folk tradition.

    I'm fascinated by the way that works. For instance, Streets of Laredo and one of my favorite blues songs, St. James Infirmary, come from the same English folk song, yet one morphs and morphs until it becomes a children's song, even if it remains sad, while the other becomes in melody and lyric a cold evocation of death that I wouldn't want my daughter to sing.

    I love your paintings, too, by the way. Do you have a larger gallery. I'd love to see more.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Justin, I'm opening an art studio in KC next month. the website is www.pollymccann.com

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